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Stay Updated and Stay healthy

The health and safety of our students, faculty and staff are our top priorities!

COVID-19 REPORTING

If you test positive or are exposed to a positive (being within 6 ft. for more than 15 minutes), please notify the University by contacting the Emergency Operations Center and completing the form on the Texas A&M University System COVID-19 Reporting Portal.

covid-19 statistics

Last updated 04/20/2021 at 8:22 a.m.

A&M-Commerce is committed to transparently reporting confirmed positive COVID-19 cases as well as quarantine numbers, both on campus and related to campus. The current COVID-19 statistics are listed below. These statistics will be updated daily, with weekend numbers reported on Monday.

  • 28 (-16) students and 2 (0) employees have tested positive for COVID-19* and are isolating.**
  • 19 (+0) students and 1 (0) employee have been exposed to someone with COVID-19 and are quarantined.

Note: Numbers in parentheses (+0) denote change over the previous update.

A dedicated care team performs wellness checks on all A&M-Commerce students who have been exposed to or tested positive for COVID-19. These students may continue their classes online.

* Contact tracing has been implemented for all cases, and all affected parties have been contacted.

**The CDC defines isolation as keeping someone away from others, even within their own home, who has tested positive for COVID-19, with or without symptoms.

***The CDC defines quarantine as keeping someone who was in close contact with someone who has COVID-19 away from others.

Learn more at cdc.gov/coronavirus.

IMPORTANT COVID-19 TESTING INFORMATION

If you are currently having symptoms of COVID-19 or have had a direct exposure to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19, per CDC and Texas A&M University-Commerce guidelines, you qualify to receive a COVID-19 test. Before receiving a test, you must have completed booking your appointment and completed a testing consent form. Student Health Services has to have both of these on record before you can be tested.

STEP 1: Complete the testing consent form. If you do not have your consent form completed by your appointment time, you will have to reschedule the appointment.

STEP 2: To book your testing appointment at Student Health Services, go to the testing signup page and follow the instructions. When booking your appointment, faculty/staff members should use their UIN and students should use their CWID.

COVID-19 tests will be performed on campus at Student Health Services, located at Henderson Hall, 1504 Lee St. Commerce, TX 75428. There will be a walk-up and drive-thru option for testing outside of Student Health Services. When you arrive for your appointment, please make sure to wear a face mask and have your appointment reference number and photo ID readily available. Please note that the COVID-19 test is an oral swab so do not eat, drink, or smoke 20 minutes before your appointment time.

If you have any questions regarding how to book your appointment, please contact Student Health Services at 903.886.5853 or 903.886.5847.

Student Health Services Notice of Privacy

COVID-19 Patient Care Instructions

Curative response to Jan. 4, 2021 FDA Safety Communication

Tabs :: Coronavirus

Coronavirus :: Removal of restrictions

Removing Certain restrictions from campus operations

Dear Lion Family,

As we begin transitioning toward a return to normal operations, I wish to share with you the following updates:

The Executive Team and the Emergency Operations Center have completed a review of the University’s policies and procedures related to events, travel, and visitors during the current COVID-19 pandemic. In light of recent developments, shifts in guidance from the CDC, The Texas A&M University System and the State of Texas, the following changes to these activities at A&M-Commerce will be implemented, effective immediately:

Events on Campus

Events on campus involving students, faculty and staff may resume, subject to the preparation and submission by each event’s organizer of a risk management plan to the University’s Risk Manager. As always, the request and risk management plan must be submitted at least seven days before the date of the event. The applicable Vice President, or his/her designee, must also approve the event’s risk management plan, keeping in mind public health and safety precautions including:

  • Size of the event venue and its capacity
  • Ability for attendees to maintain adequate distance from each other
  • Whether the venue is indoors or outdoors
  • Whether a face covering should be required
  • Whether the event will involve activities that have been shown to increase viral transmission

The University Risk Manager may request certain changes to a risk management plan based on then-current CDC guidelines, as well as any guidance or orders from the System or the State. Attached is a copy of the risk assessment event form for your information and use. This form will soon be in Laserfiche for electronic routing and approval.

Travel

Travel requests for students, faculty and staff will revert to pre-pandemic processes and approvals, with the modification that each travel request will be subject to the review and approval of the applicable Vice President, or his/her designee, of the employee’s division/unit. The Vice President (or designee) will be considering all elements related to CDC, System, and/or State of Texas guidance or orders related to the COVID-19 pandemic. A copy of the travel risk assessment form is attached for information, also.

In the case of international travel requests, however, such travel is deemed to be an extreme risk and requests will be subject to the approval by the University’s Empowered Official, who will also consider the destination and guidance from the U.S. State Department and other relevant agencies on public health and safety concerns in the destination country, in addition to export control concerns. International travelers will be required to follow the State Department’s then-current protocols for returning into the U.S.

Hosting Visitors to Campus

Visitors may be invited to campus. All visitors will be expected to observe safety requirements and recommendations established by local health authorities and university policies in effect at the time of the visit (e.g., meeting size, physical distancing, face coverings, etc.). Signage will be posted to notify everyone on campus, including visitors, that by being on campus, all visitors are agreeing they have not been determined to be COVID-19 positive, do not have COVID-19 symptoms, and have not been in the presence of anyone they knew to be COVID-19 positive in the last 14 days.

Students, faculty and staff who invite an external guest to campus are expected to inform the guest of this policy prior to their visit, and it is recommended that if the visitor expresses that he or she cannot or will not agree to this that the student, faculty or staff member find a virtual method of meeting with the guest, either by telephone or Internet.

Thank you for your efforts in making sure we keep our campus, students, faculty and staff as safe as possible.

The president signature.
Dr. Mark Rudin
President
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CARES Act

Under the federal CARES Act, students with financial hardship related to the COVID-19 pandemic may qualify for emergency funds to help cover the cost of college attendance, including housing, food, health care, child care and more.

Recipient’s Funding Certification and Agreement

A&M-Commerce Emergency Funding Allocation Plan

A&M-Commerce Quarterly Budget & Expenditure Reporting

HEERF Reporting

Below are some frequently asked questions regarding CARES Act funds.

CARES Act FAQs

When can I apply for financial assistance through the CARES Act?

Students may apply for assistance through the CARES Act at any time during the current semester but applications will not be accepted for the current term after the end of the semester.

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How are the amounts of CARES Act financial assistance payments determined?

Two factors that go into calculation of CARES Act awards are Pell grant eligibility and the number of credit hours in which a student is enrolled in a given term. You do not need to be Pell eligible to qualify for a CARES ACT award but Pell grant eligibility is a weighted factor in the award calculation.

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Can my CARES Act payment be applied to outstanding University charges?

No. Financial assistance payment through CARES cannot be applied to pay tuition/fees, housing, meal plans or other university charges. Your CARES Act award will be passed through your student account as a refund to you.

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How will I receive my CARES Act payment?

The University will process your award as a student refund. All refunds are sent to BankMobile Disbursements for distribution. Students who have a refund delivery method established at BankMobile will receive their CARES Act payment by the method they selected.

Students who do not have a refund delivery method established at BankMobile can select a refund method by going to MyLeo and using the Refund Selection app. Three delivery methods are available through BankMobile. Students can choose direct deposit to an existing bank account, refund check by mail or students can open a bank account at BankMobile and use that account for direct deposit. The choice of refund delivery method is strictly up to the student.

Students who do not choose a delivery method at BankMobile will receive their refund as a check in the mail by default.

The University strongly urges students to use direct deposit for refunds. It is the safest and quickest way to get your refund.

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Who is eligible for assistance through the CARES Act Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund?

Students must be able to qualify for Federal (Title IV) financial aid. Eligibility can be evidenced by a 2019-2020 Federal Application for Federal Student Aid (FASFA). However – you can still qualify for assistance even if you have not filed a FASFA but are eligible to do so. The criteria to participate in Federal financial aid programs under Section 484 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (HEA) as amended – include but are not limited to the following: U.S. citizenship or eligible noncitizen; a valid Social Security number; registration with Selective Service (if the student is male); and a high school diploma, GED, or completion of high school in an approved homeschool setting.

International students, undocumented students, non-matriculated students or students enrolled in distance-only degree programs are not eligible for CARES Act financial assistance.

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I was deemed ineligible for financial assistance through the CARES Act but I believe that decision was an error. Who should I contact?

Please contact the Student Accounts Office at [email protected]. We will check into your situation and respond.

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COVID-19 Vaccination FAQs

COVID-19 Vaccination FAQs

Can I stop taking safety precautions after getting a COVID-19 vaccine?

No. Experts want to learn more about the protection that a COVID-19 vaccine provides and how long immunity lasts before changing safety recommendations. Factors such as how many people get vaccinated and how the virus is spreading in the communities will affect these recommendations. We also don’t yet know whether getting a COVID-19 vaccine will prevent you from spreading the virus that causes COVID-19 to other people, even if you don’t get sick yourself.

Continue to follow these precautions even after immunization:

  • Avoid close contact (at least 2 arm lengths)
  • Wear a cloth face covering in public places
  • Practice good hand hygiene
  • Stay home if you are sick
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What COVID-19 vaccines have been approved and how do they work?

Currently, FDA has approved Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna under emergency use authorization. The data shows both vaccines are safe and effective to use. Both of the vaccines use messenger RNA which teaches our cells to create a protein that then triggers an immune response that produces antibodies. Antibodies are what protect us from getting infected if the virus enters our bodies.

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What is the efficacy rate of COVID-19 vaccines?

The Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine has an efficacy rate of 95% beginning seven days after the second dose.

  • The vaccine is for people 16 years and older.
  • It requires 2 injections 21 days apart

The Moderna vaccine shows an efficacy of 94.1% after the second dose.

  • The vaccine is for people 18 years and older.
  • It requires 2 injections 28 days apart.
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Do I have lifelong immunity after the COVID-19 vaccine?

We won’t know how long immunity lasts after immunization until we have more data on how well COVID-19 vaccines work in real world conditions. It is likely that an annual COVID-19 vaccine will be required just as with the flu vaccine.

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What are the Phases to the distribution of the Covid-19 Vaccine?

Are COVID-19 vaccines safe?

Both of the COVID-19 vaccines being used have gone through rigorous studies to ensure they are as safe as possible. Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna have conducted clinical trials with tens of thousands of participants and have met the rigorous safety and efficacy criteria set forth by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

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Can the COVID-19 vaccine give me COVID-19?

No. OVID-19 vaccines do NOT use the live virus and cannot give you COVID-19. It will not influence PCR or Antigen testing.

Keep in mind, it will take a few weeks for your body to build immunity after getting the second dose. As a result, it is possible that you could become infected with the virus just before or after getting vaccinated.

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What are the possible side effects of a COVID-19 vaccine?

A COVID-19 vaccine can cause mild side effects after the first or second dose, including:

  • Pain, redness or swelling at the injection site
  • Fever
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Chills
  • Joint pain

You will be monitored for 15 minutes after getting a vaccine. Most side effects happen within the first 3 days. If you have symptoms longer than 3 days, self-isolate and get tested.

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Can COVID-19 vaccines be interchangeable?

No. Although the mechanism of action of the two vaccines are the same, they are not identical, and the second dose should be from the same manufacturer as the first.

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Can I transmit COVID-19 after having the vaccine?

Perhaps. Most vaccines prevent the disease as opposed to preventing infection. Therefore, it is possible that some people can spread the virus without exhibiting any symptoms. Until there is more research available, it is important to continue the above safety precautions.

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Should I get the COVID-19 vaccine even if I’ve already had COVID-19?

Yes. If you’ve had COVID-19, you might want to delay vaccination until 90 days after your diagnosis. Reinfection with the virus that causes COVID-19 is uncommon in the 90 days after you are first infected.

Vaccination should also be delayed for 90 days following administration of monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma.

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Can I get a COVID-19 vaccine if I have a history of allergic reactions?

If you have a history of severe allergic reactions not related to vaccines or injectable medications, you may still get a COVID-19 vaccine. You should be monitored for 30 minutes after getting the vaccine. If you’ve had an immediate allergic reaction to other vaccines or injectable medications, ask your provider. Severe allergic reactions requiring epinephrine or hospitalizations have occurred, however, they are rare. You should not get the vaccine if you have had a previous severe allergic reaction to polyethylene glycol(PEG) which is an ingredient in the vaccine. You should not get the second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine if you experienced a severe allergic reaction with the first dose.

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What are the ingredients in COVID-19 vaccines?

Click the following links to see the ingredients for both.

Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine

Moderna COVID-19 vaccine

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Where can I check to see if the vaccine is available?

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Face masks on campus

Use of cloth face masks on campus

Where can I find more information on cloth face masks?

The CDC answers frequently asked questions about cloth face masks.

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Can I wear a cloth face mask in a laboratory?

You should maintain appropriate social distance in your work area, so the cloth face mask should be considered more for your travel to and from the laboratory and not to be worn in it. If a cloth face mask is worn in the lab space, it should be handled the same as your lab coat and therefore not worn outside of the lab again or in other public spaces. It may remain in the lab for your personal use only and washed as your lab coat would be.

A cloth face mask does not replace any other recommended or required personal protective equipment (PPE) for your duties or workspace, such as goggles, face shields or respirators, and it should not interfere with the fit or function of other PPE.

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How do I safely remove a used cloth face mask?

Be careful not to touch your eyes, nose or mouth when removing your cloth face mask. Wash your hands immediately after removing and after handling when washing.

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How often should I clean or wash my cloth face mask?

Your face mask should be washed routinely depending on the frequency of use. Regular machine washing and drying is sufficient. You may need to remove and discard any elastic or rubber bands prior to washing and drying and then replace them when the fabric portion is clean, if applicable.

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How can I make my own cloth face mask?

The US Surgeon General demonstrates how to make a simple cloth face mask without resorting to sewing. The CDC also provides instructions on how to create face masks both with and without sewing.

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Attending Classes Online FAQ

Attending Classes Online

What should I do if I’m experiencing issues with YouSeeU-Virtual Class?

  1. Be sure you’re using a recommended browser – either Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox.
  2. Check the Basic System Requirements
  3. If you’re still having issues, call D2L Brightspace support at 1-877-325-7778.
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What do I do if I’m kicked out of an online exam?

  1. Contact your professor immediately and let them know what happened.
  2. Attempt to re-enter the quiz or exam in myleo online (D2L Brightspace).
  3. If this is unsuccessful, call D2L Brightspace Support at 877.325.7778.

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What are the myLeo Online (D2L Brightspace) platform requirements?

  1. Recommended browsers are Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox.
  2. Keep your browser updated if possible.
  3. On this page there is a word document called “PlatformReqts_Guide.docx”. Click it for more information
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I forgot my CWID and password. What do I do?

Don’t fret! Recovering your password is simple.

  1. There are two links out to the side of the CWID and Password entry fields that say “Forgot your password?” and “Forgot your CWID?” Use these to recover your log-in information.
  2. If you have any difficulty accessing the myLeo Portal, email IT Support or call 903.468.6000.
Screen-Shot-2020-03-13-at-4.31.52-PM
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What should I do if I’m experiencing issues with myLeo Online?

Go to the D2L support page and click “Contact Support”. From here you can call, email, or chat with a support expert 24 hours a day.

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Why is my course not showing in myLeo Online?

  1. Make sure you are registered for the course. Login to myLeo and check Your Schedule Detail under the Registration Menu.
  2. If you are registered and your course is not showing up under the MyLeo Online (D2L Brightspace) widget, please email [email protected] with your CWID and the course you are registered for.
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How do I access my classes online courses?

Using myLeo

  • Login to myLeo
    • Using CWID and password for students;
    • Use lastname/firstname and password for faculty. (AD credentials)
  • Navigate to “Apps” and select the myLeo Online (D2L Brightspace) icon

Direct Access

  1. Login to the Learning Management System
    1. Using CWID and password for students;
    2. Use lastname/firstname and password for faculty. (AD credentials)
  2. Scroll down to the middle of the page to find the My Courses widget.
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FAQs :: Coronavirus

Staying Healthy

How can I protect myself from the virus?

Stay educated on the disease by reading the CDC website. Most people who become infected experience a mild illness and recover, but it can be more severe for others.

Take care of yourself by doing the following:

  • Stay home if you don’t feel well. If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention and call ahead to the medical office.
  • Regularly and thoroughly wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds, or use an alcohol-based hand rub. This helps kill viruses that might be on your hand.
  • Stay at least three feet away from someone who is coughing or sneezing.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth.
  • Follow good respiratory hygiene, which means covering your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Dispose of the tissue immediately.
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What is A&M-Commerce doing?

Texas A&M University-Commerce leadership is meeting regularly to discuss and review the rapidly evolving situation regarding the spread of the coronavirus, now known as COVID-19.

The university is coordinating with the Texas A&M University System and other intuitions of higher education to ensure that issues related to campus communities are appropriately addressed. We would like to remind the community to practice good hygiene to lower the risk of becoming ill.

The university will continue to address questions and concerns through its various social media platforms, as well as the university website.

An email address and phone line have also been established to answer questions regarding the Coronavirus. Reach out with your questions at either [email protected] or at 903.468.3091

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What is COVID-19 and how does it spread?

COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by the most recently discovered coronavirus, which can cause illness in humans and animals. Those who have become sick are reported to develop cough, fever, breathing difficulties and tiredness. In severe cases, organ failure has been reported.

  • What experts know about COVID-19, a relatively new virus, is largely based on what is known about similar coronaviruses. The World Health Organization named this illness “coronavirus disease 2019” (abbreviated COVID-19).
  • Person-to-person: The CDC says that the virus is spread mainly from person-to-person, which means those who are in close contact with one another, and/or through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Those droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby and possibly be inhaled into the lungs.
  • CDC officials say that it is possible a person can contract COVID-19 by touching a surface or an object that has the virus on it, and then touching their own mouth, nose or eyes, but they said this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.
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What if my roommate has a cough?

It is important to remember that this is cold and flu season, and regardless of an individual’s travel history, coughs and other upper-respiratory symptoms are much more likely to be signs of a bad cold or seasonal influenza than the new coronavirus. You can protect yourself in the same ways you would normally do to avoid getting sick:

  • Clean your hands, and remind others to do the same. Wash your hands for 20 seconds frequently and thoroughly with soap and warm water, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Don’t share towels. Use paper towels after washing your hands, or use a cloth towel that isn’t shared with anyone else.
  • Clean common surfaces. Use a standard household disinfectant, and wash your hands after cleaning the area.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick and avoid close contact with those who are sick.
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What should I do if I feel ill?

  • If you are feeling ill, make an appointment with your healthcare provider.
  • Please do not show up at a clinic, urgent care or other healthcare facilities without calling first. Your provider may need to take special measures to protect other people in the clinic. Telemedicine may also be available, enabling you to consult a provider from home.
  • Check with your health insurance provider. If you have symptoms such as a cough, fever, or other respiratory problems, contact your primary care doctor first.
  • Do not go to an emergency room. Emergency rooms need to be able to serve those with the most critical needs.
  • Practice social distancing. Stay indoors and avoid contact with others, just as you would with the flu. Those with contagious diseases should stay home from work or school until they are well. People with fever, cough and respiratory issues should seek immediate medical attention.
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Behaviors of Bias

Be aware that concern around this emerging issue can lead to stigma and bias.

  • Coronavirus doesn’t recognize race, nationality or ethnicity.
  • Wearing a medical mask does not mean that a person is ill.
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What countries are at-risk with COVID-19?

The CDC has established geographic risk-stratification criteria for the purpose of issuing travel health notices for countries with COVID-19 transmission and guiding public health management decisions for people with potential travel-related exposures to COVID-19. A number of factors inform the geographic risk stratification, including size, geographic distribution and epidemiology of the outbreak. View a risk assessment map.

For up-to-date health notices, visit the CDC and U.S. State Department websites.

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Is there a vaccine, drug or treatment for COVID-19?

Medical experts across the globe are rushing to find a cure. However, there is not one at this time. The disease is viral, which means antibiotics will not help; the antiviral drugs that work against the flu do not work against coronavirus. Those with a weak immune system and those who already are sick are urged to be especially cautious.

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What is the risk for developing the coronavirus in Texas?

The Texas Health and Human Services said the risk for all Texans, including those in Commerce, remains low. Continue to avoid close contact with people who are sick; avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth; stay home when you are sick; cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash; avoid shaking hands; clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.

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What does it mean to self-monitor?

According to the CDC, self-monitoring means people should monitor themselves for fever by taking their temperatures twice a day and remain alert for a cough or difficulty breathing. If you feel feverish or develop measured fever, cough, or difficulty breathing during the self-monitoring period, you should self-isolate, limit contact with others, and seek advice by telephone from a healthcare provider.

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What does it mean to self-isolate?

If you are not experiencing any symptoms of COVID-19 and are asked to self-isolate after returning from a country listed on the CDC’s COVID-19 travel advisories page as Level 3, you should stay off-campus and remain home.

Do not go to campus including work, residence halls and apartments, classes, athletic events or other social gatherings until 14 days after leaving the Level 3 country in question. Likewise, avoid public places and gatherings in the community.

Please contact your Community Director if you live on campus and will not be returning due to the requirement of self-isolation.

Please follow these guidelines for self-isolation:

  • Report any symptoms of COVID-19 immediately to your medical provider – preferably by calling to get advice and instructions.
  • Stay in your room or apartment. Do not go to work, classes, athletic events, or other social or religious gatherings until 14 days after your return to the United States from the country in question.
  • Limit contact as much as possible. This also means limiting close contact with others including persons living in your residence.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water, or use alcohol-based hand rubs after coughing or sneezing or throwing a used tissue in the garbage.
  • Avoid sharing household items. Do not share drinking glasses, towels, eating utensils, bedding, or any other items until you are no longer asked to self-isolate.
  • Keep your surroundings clean. While the virus is not spread very well from contact with soiled household surfaces, try to clean surfaces that you share with others, such as doorknobs, telephones, and bathroom surfaces (or any other object that you sneeze or cough on), with a standard household disinfectant wipe. Wash your hands after cleaning the area.
  • Monitor yourself for symptoms at least daily including measuring your temperature. Any symptoms of COVID-19 should be reported to your physician. To download the CDC Check and Report Every Day (CARE) Booklet which helps you understand how to self-monitor your health and how to check your symptoms daily visit: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/COVID-19_CAREKit_ENG.pdf
  • Cover coughs and sneezes with your upper sleeve or a tissue. Never cough in the direction of someone else.
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Where should I go to get accurate information on COVID-19?

Keep checking the university’s COVID-19 webpage here, as well as the following:

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Travel

Coronavirus: What countries are at-risk with COVID-19?

The CDC has established geographic risk-stratification criteria for the purpose of issuing travel health notices for countries with COVID-19 transmission and guiding public health management decisions for people with potential travel-related exposures to COVID-19. A number of factors inform the geographic risk stratification, including size, geographic distribution and epidemiology of the outbreak. View a risk assessment map.

For up-to-date health notices, visit the CDC and U.S. State Department websites.

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Coronavirus: What should I do if I return to campus from travel?

Students, faculty and staff who travel internationally — whether for personal or university business — are required to notify the university regarding that travel immediately by contacting [email protected]

INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL TO AIRPORTS SPECIFIED: Any faculty, staff and students returning from international travel on or after March 14 and arriving in-country to clear customs at the Boston (BOS), Miami (MIA), New York City (JFK), Chicago (ORD), San Francisco (SFO), Seattle (SEA), Los Angeles (LAX), Atlanta (ATL), Honolulu (HNL), Newark (EWR), Dallas (DFW), Detroit (DTW) or Washington, D.C. (IAD) international airports should consider themselves as having returned from a Level 3 COVID-19 location and self-isolate for 14 days after their arrival before returning to campus.

ALL OTHER TRAVEL: Domestic travelers through all airports and international travelers from non-level 3 countries arriving at airports other than those listed are required only to self-monitor at this time, for development of COVID-19 symptoms.

According the CDC website, self-monitoring includes taking temperatures twice a day and remain alert for cough or difficulty breathing. If you feel feverish or develop measured fever, cough, or difficulty breathing during the self-monitoring period, you should self-isolate, limit contact with others, and seek advice by telephone from a healthcare provider. Employees must notify their supervisor immediately.

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What does it mean to self-isolate?

If you are not experiencing any symptoms of COVID-19 and are asked to self-isolate after returning from a country listed on the CDC’s COVID-19 travel advisories page as Level 3, you should stay off-campus and remain home.

Do not go to campus including work, residence halls and apartments, classes, athletic events or other social gatherings until 14 days after leaving the Level 3 country in question. Likewise, avoid public places and gatherings in the community.

Please contact your Community Director if you live on campus and will not be returning due to the requirement of self-isolation.

Please follow these guidelines for self-isolation:

  • Report any symptoms of COVID-19 immediately to your medical provider – preferably by calling to get advice and instructions.
  • Stay in your room or apartment. Do not go to work, classes, athletic events, or other social or religious gatherings until 14 days after your return to the United States from the country in question.
  • Limit contact as much as possible. This also means limiting close contact with others including persons living in your residence.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water, or use alcohol-based hand rubs after coughing or sneezing or throwing a used tissue in the garbage.
  • Avoid sharing household items. Do not share drinking glasses, towels, eating utensils, bedding, or any other items until you are no longer asked to self-isolate.
  • Keep your surroundings clean. While the virus is not spread very well from contact with soiled household surfaces, try to clean surfaces that you share with others, such as doorknobs, telephones, and bathroom surfaces (or any other object that you sneeze or cough on), with a standard household disinfectant wipe. Wash your hands after cleaning the area.
  • Monitor yourself for symptoms at least daily including measuring your temperature. Any symptoms of COVID-19 should be reported to your physician. To download the CDC Check and Report Every Day (CARE) Booklet which helps you understand how to self-monitor your health and how to check your symptoms daily visit: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/COVID-19_CAREKit_ENG.pdf
  • Cover coughs and sneezes with your upper sleeve or a tissue. Never cough in the direction of someone else.
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What does it mean to self-monitor?

According to the CDC, self-monitoring means people should monitor themselves for fever by taking their temperatures twice a day and remain alert for a cough or difficulty breathing. If you feel feverish or develop measured fever, cough, or difficulty breathing during the self-monitoring period, you should self-isolate, limit contact with others, and seek advice by telephone from a healthcare provider.

Do you find this helpful? Yes No

Where should I avoid travel?

The CDC provides travel notices and makes recommendations on postponing or canceling travel. These are called travel notices and are based on an assessment of the potential health risks involved with traveling to a certain area. A list of destinations with travel notices is available on the CDC website travel page.

  • Warning Level 3: CDC recommends travelers avoid all nonessential travel to destinations with level 3 travel notices because of the risk of getting COVID-19.
  • Alert Level 2: Because COVID-19 can be more serious in older adults and those with chronic medical conditions, people in these groups should talk to a healthcare provider and consider postponing travel to destinations with level 2 travel notices.
  • Watch Level 1: CDC does not recommend canceling or postponing travel to destinations with level 1 travel notices because the risk of COVID-19 is thought to be low. If you travel, take the following routine precautions:
    • Avoid contact with sick people.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands. Clean your hands often by washing them with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60%–95% alcohol. Soap and water should be used if hands are visibly dirty.
    • It is especially important to clean hands after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose.
Do you find this helpful? Yes No

What if I return from travel and I am feeling ill?

If you were in a location with a COVID-19 outbreak and have felt sick with fever, a cough or difficulty breathing, within 14 days after you left, you should do the following:

  • Seek medical advice – Call ahead before you go to a doctor’s office or emergency room. Tell them about your recent travel and your symptoms.
  • Avoid contact with others.
  • Do not travel on public transportation while sick.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds to avoid spreading the virus to others.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water immediately after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, you can use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60 percent to 95 percent alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Employees must notify their supervisor immediately.
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President Rudin's Letter :: Coronavirus

Texas A&M University-Commerce President Dr. Mark Rudin has issued multiple statements to the Lion community regarding the university’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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TAMUC Helps

A&M System Update on covid-19 protocols: 3-5-21

Over the past year, the Texas A&M System institutions have done an amazing job in responding to the pandemic and protecting the health of our faculty, staff and students.

With the end of the spring semester only 6-8 weeks away, A&M system members should continue to follow system guidance, “Guidance for Spring Semester of 2021 and Related Issues” issued in October 2020 on testing, face coverings, classes, physical distancing, occupancy limitations, co-curricular activities, among other matters.

Based on our assessment of current conditions, this step will help us successfully complete the semester and is consistent with Gov. Greg Abbott’s order that masking and other protocols should be decided by our institutions, not by the state.

At the conclusion of the spring semester, we anticipate System guidance being lifted so that all rules, procedures and practices regarding classes, travel, face coverings, testing, etc., will be determined locally at your institution informed by your conditions and reviewed by the System.

The System may provide additional guidance this semester or going forward, as conditions warrant.

John Sharp
Chancellor
The Texas A&M University System

SYstem guidance for Spring 2021

tamuc helps

Texas A&M University-Commerce has been hard at work ensuring that students, faculty and staff are safe, healthy and continuing to receive quality education and services. Read more about our efforts in the stories below!

message of thanks from A&M-Kingsville

Dear Dr. Rudin:

We at Texas A&m University-Kingsville truly thank you and Texas A&M University-Commerce for your donation of COVID-19 supplies that included safety glasses, hand sanitizer, disinfectant, and latex gloves. You will be pleased to know that we immediately distributed these items to our Javelina Enrollment Services Center, Library, Business Office, and Information Technology Services Office. These supplies have already been put to good use.

Just like us, we realize that your campus has face many challenges over the past few weeks and will continue to do so in the coming weeks and months. We wish you and the Texas A&M University-Commerce community a safe and healthy environment and please know that you can call on us if we may be of service to you or your university.

Sincerely,

Mark A. Hussey

President

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Chancellor Sharp's Memo :: Coronavirus

Chancellor’s video on Coronavirus

Dr. Ben Neuman on Coronavirus

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Guidance on travel

Guidance on Travel

Last updated 06/07/2020

The guidance below is an update to Texas travel guidelines, but does not replace national guidelines issued.

Governor Abbott has released previous travel restrictions for persons entering the State of Texas. At this time, there are no additional requirements for mandatory self-quarantine for persons entering Texas.

The Chancellor for The Texas A&M University System has extended the travel guidelines beyond May 31 as originally outlined in his memo dated 03.10.2020, until further notice. System Risk Management will consider all International travel extreme risk and not approved. The current mandate is in effect until further notice. The only exception to this would be any mission-critical COVID-19 related assistance or health-critical exceptions, and these exceptions must be approved in advance by Executive Leadership.

Refer to current information and policies from the airlines, car rental companies and hotel chains.

Last updated 05/04/2020

The guidance below is an update to Texas travel guidelines, but does not replace national guidelines previously issued and still standing.

Every person who enters the State of Texas as the final destination through an airport, from a point of origin or point of last departure in the following —State of California; State of Connecticut; State of New York; State of New Jersey; State of Washington; City of Atlanta, Georgia; City of Chicago, Illinois; City of Detroit, Michigan; or City of Miami, Florida—shall be subject to mandatory self-quarantine for a period of 14 days from the time of entry into Texas or the duration of the person’s presence in Texas, whichever is shorter. The governor may by proclamation add to or subtract from the list of states and cities covered by this executive order. This order to self-quarantine shall not apply to people traveling in connection with military service, emergency response, health response, or critical-infrastructure functions, as may be determined by the Texas Division of Emergency Management. Each person covered under this order to self-quarantine shall be responsible for all associated costs, including transportation, lodging, food, and medical care.

Last updated on 03/30/2020

Persons Traveling to Texas from Certain Destinations Should Self Isolate for 14-Days Before Returning to Campus

The guidance below is in addition to the guidance previously provided and is not a replacement for those original instructions.

Every person who enters the State of Texas as the final destination through an airport, from a point of origin or point of last departure in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, California, Louisiana, Washington, Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Detroit, MI, or Miami, FL, shall be subject to mandatory self-isolation for a period of 14 days from the time of entry into Texas. All road travelers arriving in Texas from any location in Louisiana must also self-isolate for a period of 14 days. This order to self-quarantine shall not apply to people traveling in connection with military service, emergency response, health response, or critical-infrastructure functions, as may be determined by the Texas Division of Emergency Management. (Governor’s Executive Orders GA-12 and GA-11).

Previously Issued Guidance:

As you may be aware, the new United States government travel restrictions are routing travelers from Europe and other Level 3 countries through a specific set of 13 arrival airports in the United States.

As a result of the increased health screening upon arrival at these airports, and as these airports are experiencing long delays and large volumes of traffic clearing customs and health screening, any international traveler arriving at these airports (listed below) – be it coming from a Level 3 or other country – from Saturday March 14 onward will have an increased chance of exposure than other travelers.

Therefore, any faculty, staff and students returning from international travel on or after March 14 and arriving in-country to clear customs at the Boston (BOS), Miami (MIA), New York City (JFK), Chicago (ORD), San Francisco (SFO), Seattle (SEA), Los Angeles (LAX), Atlanta (ATL), Honolulu (HNL), Newark (EWR), Dallas (DFW), Detroit (DTW) or Washington, D.C. (IAD) international airports should consider themselves as having returned from a Level 3 COVID-19 location and self-isolate for 14 days after their arrival before returning to campus.

Residential students who meet the above criteria, who are already on campus will need to return home. For those students who are returning home, they need to notify [email protected]. If there is an inability to return home, student residents should contact [email protected].

Domestic travelers through all airports and international travelers from non-level 3 countries arriving at airports other than those listed are required only to self-monitor at this time.

Travelers should also notify the campus by emailing [email protected]. Self-monitoring and self-isolation explanations can be found on the FAQ website.

Additional guidance and restrictions regarding travel while the outbreak of COVID-19, also known as Coronavirus, continues is below:

  • All domestic and all international travel is to be cancelled.
  • Requests for mission critical domestic travel must be approved by VP level.
  • All students, faculty and staff are strongly encouraged to refrain from all personal international travel until further notice.
  • All business related conferences should be postponed until further notice.
  • Everyone is asked to consider if personal travel plans can be postponed.
  • All students, faculty, and staff currently traveling in all Level 1 or higher risk countries are encouraged to return as soon as can be practically arranged.
  • Students, faculty, and staff are directed to report all business and personal international travel to the university by email at [email protected].
  • Students are required to self-isolate at an off-campus or family residence whenever practical. Students should contact the university if these options are impractical at [email protected].

Travel

Coronavirus: What countries are at-risk with COVID-19?

The CDC has established geographic risk-stratification criteria for the purpose of issuing travel health notices for countries with COVID-19 transmission and guiding public health management decisions for people with potential travel-related exposures to COVID-19. A number of factors inform the geographic risk stratification, including size, geographic distribution and epidemiology of the outbreak. View a risk assessment map.

For up-to-date health notices, visit the CDC and U.S. State Department websites.

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Coronavirus: What should I do if I return to campus from travel?

Students, faculty and staff who travel internationally — whether for personal or university business — are required to notify the university regarding that travel immediately by contacting [email protected]

INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL TO AIRPORTS SPECIFIED: Any faculty, staff and students returning from international travel on or after March 14 and arriving in-country to clear customs at the Boston (BOS), Miami (MIA), New York City (JFK), Chicago (ORD), San Francisco (SFO), Seattle (SEA), Los Angeles (LAX), Atlanta (ATL), Honolulu (HNL), Newark (EWR), Dallas (DFW), Detroit (DTW) or Washington, D.C. (IAD) international airports should consider themselves as having returned from a Level 3 COVID-19 location and self-isolate for 14 days after their arrival before returning to campus.

ALL OTHER TRAVEL: Domestic travelers through all airports and international travelers from non-level 3 countries arriving at airports other than those listed are required only to self-monitor at this time, for development of COVID-19 symptoms.

According the CDC website, self-monitoring includes taking temperatures twice a day and remain alert for cough or difficulty breathing. If you feel feverish or develop measured fever, cough, or difficulty breathing during the self-monitoring period, you should self-isolate, limit contact with others, and seek advice by telephone from a healthcare provider. Employees must notify their supervisor immediately.

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What does it mean to self-isolate?

If you are not experiencing any symptoms of COVID-19 and are asked to self-isolate after returning from a country listed on the CDC’s COVID-19 travel advisories page as Level 3, you should stay off-campus and remain home.

Do not go to campus including work, residence halls and apartments, classes, athletic events or other social gatherings until 14 days after leaving the Level 3 country in question. Likewise, avoid public places and gatherings in the community.

Please contact your Community Director if you live on campus and will not be returning due to the requirement of self-isolation.

Please follow these guidelines for self-isolation:

  • Report any symptoms of COVID-19 immediately to your medical provider – preferably by calling to get advice and instructions.
  • Stay in your room or apartment. Do not go to work, classes, athletic events, or other social or religious gatherings until 14 days after your return to the United States from the country in question.
  • Limit contact as much as possible. This also means limiting close contact with others including persons living in your residence.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water, or use alcohol-based hand rubs after coughing or sneezing or throwing a used tissue in the garbage.
  • Avoid sharing household items. Do not share drinking glasses, towels, eating utensils, bedding, or any other items until you are no longer asked to self-isolate.
  • Keep your surroundings clean. While the virus is not spread very well from contact with soiled household surfaces, try to clean surfaces that you share with others, such as doorknobs, telephones, and bathroom surfaces (or any other object that you sneeze or cough on), with a standard household disinfectant wipe. Wash your hands after cleaning the area.
  • Monitor yourself for symptoms at least daily including measuring your temperature. Any symptoms of COVID-19 should be reported to your physician. To download the CDC Check and Report Every Day (CARE) Booklet which helps you understand how to self-monitor your health and how to check your symptoms daily visit: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/COVID-19_CAREKit_ENG.pdf
  • Cover coughs and sneezes with your upper sleeve or a tissue. Never cough in the direction of someone else.
Do you find this helpful? Yes No

What does it mean to self-monitor?

According to the CDC, self-monitoring means people should monitor themselves for fever by taking their temperatures twice a day and remain alert for a cough or difficulty breathing. If you feel feverish or develop measured fever, cough, or difficulty breathing during the self-monitoring period, you should self-isolate, limit contact with others, and seek advice by telephone from a healthcare provider.

Do you find this helpful? Yes No

Where should I avoid travel?

The CDC provides travel notices and makes recommendations on postponing or canceling travel. These are called travel notices and are based on an assessment of the potential health risks involved with traveling to a certain area. A list of destinations with travel notices is available on the CDC website travel page.

  • Warning Level 3: CDC recommends travelers avoid all nonessential travel to destinations with level 3 travel notices because of the risk of getting COVID-19.
  • Alert Level 2: Because COVID-19 can be more serious in older adults and those with chronic medical conditions, people in these groups should talk to a healthcare provider and consider postponing travel to destinations with level 2 travel notices.
  • Watch Level 1: CDC does not recommend canceling or postponing travel to destinations with level 1 travel notices because the risk of COVID-19 is thought to be low. If you travel, take the following routine precautions:
    • Avoid contact with sick people.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands. Clean your hands often by washing them with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60%–95% alcohol. Soap and water should be used if hands are visibly dirty.
    • It is especially important to clean hands after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose.
Do you find this helpful? Yes No

What if I return from travel and I am feeling ill?

If you were in a location with a COVID-19 outbreak and have felt sick with fever, a cough or difficulty breathing, within 14 days after you left, you should do the following:

  • Seek medical advice – Call ahead before you go to a doctor’s office or emergency room. Tell them about your recent travel and your symptoms.
  • Avoid contact with others.
  • Do not travel on public transportation while sick.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when coughing or sneezing.
  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds to avoid spreading the virus to others.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water immediately after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, you can use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains 60 percent to 95 percent alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
  • Employees must notify their supervisor immediately.
Do you find this helpful? Yes No
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Greatest Need Fund

Give to the Greatest Need Fund

Want to make a difference in the Lion community during this time of crisis? Consider giving to the Greatest Need Fund.

How can I help?

Your gift to the Greatest Need Fund is the best way to help members of the campus community most impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

How will these funds be used?

In the current environment of quickly shifting needs, gifts made to the Greatest Need Fund allow flexibility in providing support where it will make the most impact on any given day.

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Homepage::online classes

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Access all your classes from home

All classes, including face-to-face, blended, and fully online courses can be accessed from our Online Learning Management System using your CWID and password. For additional information regarding accessing myLeo Online, please consult our FAQ.

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Work from Home

Working from home

Access the information and resources you need while working remotely. Our Center for IT Excellence is here to support your technology needs.

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